BF-2[1].jpg

....

Right to Life

The right to life is the right on which all other rights depend. It imposes on the State an obligation not only to refrain from threatening or killing people, but also to promote the conditions necessary for survival.

99% of maternal deaths happen in developing countries, where poverty and lack of infrastructure can threaten survival. In many of the places where women and their babies die around childbirth, women’s health and life is considered to be literally worth less than men’s, with deadly consequences for females. The promotion of women’s right to life in the context of maternity care requires consideration of the full range of women’s social, economic, and political circumstances.

Women are not dying of diseases we can’t treat. … They are dying because societies have yet to make the decision that their lives are worth saving.
— Mahmoud Fathallah, past-president of the International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

African-American women are 3-4 times more likely to die in childbirth in the USA than the general population. What does this statistic indicate about Black women’s right to be alive in the USA? To be supported around reproduction? How is this statistic a legacy of the atrocities of childbirth in slavery, when African-American women were openly denied the right to life? What are the avenues through which African-American women’s right to life continues to be denied around childbirth today? HRiC supports the network of people working at both grass roots and policy levels to answer those questions and find solutions.

Who is looking out for the baby?

Objections to women’s efforts to exercise the right to informed consent and refusal in childbirth are usually couched in an assertion of the unborn’s right to life. When providers or lawmakers attempt to restrict women’s healthcare choices around childbirth—like the choice to refuse cesarean section, or the choice to give birth at home with a midwife—they often argue that birthing women don’t have the right to make choices that “put their baby at risk.”

From a legal perspective, these assertions are problematic. Every person has the right to refuse medical procedures, even if they the procedure (for example, an organ donation) might save the life of another person. It is a violation of the birthing woman’s bodily integrity to force her to submit to unwanted medical treatment, even if doing so would save the baby’s life.

More important, the reality of decision-making in childbirth is rarely, if ever, so clear. Every decision involves complicated short and long term risks and benefits. Nobody can guarantee a “good outcome” from a given decision, and stillbirth happens sometimes, no matter who is in control. Someone must weigh the unique risks and benefits of the decisions in a given birth, and have the final say in those decisions. That person must be the mother. An unborn baby is represented by the person who is most invested in its health and well-being. Nobody is more invested in the health and well-being of a being-born baby than the person who grew it under her heart, from her blood. The maternal-fetal dyad is best protected when the birthing mother is respected as a competent decision-maker for herself and her child.

Laws that restrict women’s reproductive options don’t change their choices, but they do increase their risk of dying from those choices. Some women will choose to give birth at home, whether or not their healthcare system supports that choice as legitimate. When that choice is marginalized or driven underground, continuity of care is undermined, with predictably deadly results for women and babies. Reproductive healthcare maximizes safety and survival when it serves to support women, instead of control them.

..

Right to Life

The right to life is the right on which all other rights depend. It imposes on the State an obligation not only to refrain from threatening or killing people, but also to promote the conditions necessary for survival.

99% of maternal deaths happen in developing countries, where poverty and lack of infrastructure can threaten survival. In many of the places where women and their babies die around childbirth, women’s health and life is considered to be literally worth less than men’s, with deadly consequences for females. The promotion of women’s right to life in the context of maternity care requires consideration of the full range of women’s social, economic, and political circumstances.

Women are not dying of diseases we can’t treat. … They are dying because societies have yet to make the decision that their lives are worth saving.
— Mahmoud Fathallah, past-president of the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecologists

African-American women are 3-4 times more likely to die in childbirth in the USA than the general population. What does this statistic indicate about Black women’s right to be alive in the USA? To be supported around reproduction? How is this statistic a legacy of the atrocities of childbirth in slavery, when African-American women were openly denied the right to life? What are the avenues through which African-American women’s right to life continues to be denied around childbirth today? HRiC supports the network of people working at both grass roots and policy levels to answer those questions and find solutions.

Who is looking out for the baby?

Objections to women’s efforts to exercise the right to informed consent and refusal in childbirth are usually couched in an assertion of the unborn’s right to life. When providers or lawmakers attempt to restrict women’s healthcare choices around childbirth—like the choice to refuse cesarean section, or the choice to give birth at home with a midwife—they often argue that birthing women don’t have the right to make choices that “put their baby at risk.”

From a legal perspective, these assertions are problematic. Every person has the right to refuse medical procedures, even if they the procedure (for example, an organ donation) might save the life of another person. It is a violation of the birthing woman’s bodily integrity to force her to submit to unwanted medical treatment, even if doing so would save the baby’s life.

More important, the reality of decision-making in childbirth is rarely, if ever, so clear. Every decision involves complicated short and long term risks and benefits. Nobody can guarantee a “good outcome” from a given decision, and stillbirth happens sometimes, no matter who is in control. Someone must weigh the unique risks and benefits of the decisions in a given birth, and have the final say in those decisions. That person must be the mother. An unborn baby is represented by the person who is most invested in its health and well-being. Nobody is more invested in the health and well-being of a being-born baby than the person who grew it under her heart, from her blood. The maternal-fetal dyad is best protected when the birthing mother is respected as a competent decision-maker for herself and her child.

Laws that restrict women’s reproductive options don’t change their choices, but they do increase their risk of dying from those choices. Some women will choose to give birth at home, whether or not their healthcare system supports that choice as legitimate. When that choice is marginalized or driven underground, continuity of care is undermined, with predictably deadly results for women and babies. Reproductive healthcare maximizes safety and survival when it serves to support women, instead of control them.

..

Diritto alla vita

Il diritto alla vita è il diritto dal quale dipendono tutti gli altri diritti. Esso impone allo Stato l'obbligo, non solo di astenersi dal minacciare o uccidere le persone, ma anche di promuovere le condizioni necessarie per la sopravvivenza.

Le donne non muoiono durante la gravidanza e il parto a causa di condizioni incurabili, ma perché le società devono ancora stabilire che le loro vite meritano di essere salvate.”
— Mahmoud F. Fathalla, ex-presidente della Federazione Internazionale di Ginecologia e Ostetricia

Il 99% di morti materne si verifica nei Paesi in via di sviluppo, dove la povertà e la mancanza di infrastrutture può minacciare la sopravvivenza. In molti dei Paesi in cui c’è un alto tasso di mortalità delle donne nel parto e dei bambini alla nascita, la salute e la vita delle donne è considerata di valore inferiore rispetto a quella degli uomini, con conseguenze mortali per le donne. La promozione del diritto delle donne alla vita nell’ambito dell’assistenza alla nascita deve essere inserito nel più vasto contesto delle condizioni sociali, economiche e politiche delle donne medesime. L'assistenza alla salute riproduttiva realizza la massima sicurezza e assicura la sopravvivenza quando è orientata a sostenere le donne invece di controllarle.

Negli Stati Uniti le donne afroamericane hanno una probabilità 3-4 volte maggiore di morire diparto rispetto alla popolazione generale. Cosa dimostra questa statistica in relazione al diritto alla vita delle donne di colore negli Stati Uniti? E che cosa prova in relazione al diritto delle donne di colore a vedere tutelata la propria salute riproduttiva? In quale misura questa statistica rappresenta un'eredità delle atrocità realizzate nel periodo della schiavitù, quando alle donne afroamericane veniva esplicitamente rifiutato il diritto alla vita? Quali sono le modalità attraverso le quali, ancora oggi, alle donne afroamericane continua ad essere negato il diritto alla vita nell’assistenza al parto? HRiC supporta la rete di persone che lavorano sia in collegamento con movimenti da basso sia a livello politico ed istituzionale per dare risposte a queste domande e per trovare delle soluzioni.

Chi si prende cura del bambino?

Alle donne che cercano di esercitare il proprio diritto ad esprimere un consenso informato e/o un dissenso informato agli intereventi medici nel parto viene solitamente contrapposto il diritto alla vita del bambino che portano in grembo. Quando gli operatori sanitari o i legislatori cercano di limitare il diritto alla libera scelta delle donne nell'assistenza alla nascita – come il diritto di rifiutare il taglio cesareo oppure il diritto di partorire in casa con l'ostetrica – l'argomento più ricorrente è che le donne non hanno il diritto di fare delle scelte che “mettono a rischio il loro bambino”.

Dal punto di vista legale, queste affermazioni sono problematiche. Ogni persona ha il diritto di rifiutare gli interventi medici, anche se tali interventi (per esempio, la donazione degli organi) potrebbero salvare la vita di un altro essere umano. Pertanto si può affermare che rappresenta una violazione del diritto all'integrità fisica obbligare la partoriente a sottoporsi ad un intervento medico non desiderato, anche se questo potrebbe salvare la vita del suo bambino.

Un fattore fondamentale da tenere in considerazione riguarda il processo decisionale nell’ambito del parto, un processo a volte, se non spesso, poco chiaro. Ogni decisione implica l’assunzione di rischi e la valutazione dei benefici nel lungo e nel breve termine. Nessuno può garantire sull'“buon esito” di una certa decisione, e capita ancora che i bambini muoiano alla nascita al di là di chi abbia il controllo decisionale. Tuttavia qualcuno deve valutare i singoli rischi e benefici delle decisioni prese in una situazione di parto, e avere l'ultima parola in queste decisioni. Questa persona deve essere la madre. Il bimbo non ancora nato è rappresentato dalla persona che più si prende cura della sua salute e del suo benessere. Nessuno è più coinvolto nella salute e nel benessere del bambino che sta per nascere che la persona che l'ha cresciuto sotto il suo cuore, nutrendolo del proprio sangue. La coppia madre-feto è più protetta quando la donna che partorisce è rispettata in quanto competente nel prendere le decisioni riguardo a se stessa e al suo bambino.

Le leggi che riducono le opzioni riproduttive delle donne non cambiano le scelte delle donne, ma aumentano il rischio delle donne di morire per queste scelte. Alcune donne preferiranno partorire a casa, sia che il sistema sanitario consideri o meno questa scelta come legittima. Quando la donna viene emarginata per le scelte che compie e costretta alla clandestinità, la continuità della cura viene compromessa, con possibili conseguenze tragiche per le donne e i loro bambini. L'assistenza sanitaria nell'ambito della riproduzione può raggiungere la massima sicurezza possibile e garantire la sopravvivenza quando è indirizzata a sostenere le donne invece di controllarle.

....

English
Deutsch
Italiano